Friday, 29 May 2020

The ATA's own Spring Wildlife Census needs more volunteers

We all know the Triangle is green. But how green? Lock Down has made London a quieter, cleaner place. And it's given us time to pay more attention to what this means for the wildlife in our own neighbourhoods. A group of Triangle residents are using this extraordinary opportunity to find out - and they want more help with recording what's moving, and what's growing, all around us.
There's definitely something exciting in it for kids - show them this video of Ashburnham Grove's fox cubs: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lwaXIbBpLyM
But whatever your interests - birds, blossoms or insects - there's plenty more to see: here are some of Egerton Drive's busy bees: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QSbkAcT3LeA
Each week those helping with the Spring Census are sending in a short record of what they have seen - in words, or in pictures like these - to Census co-ordinator, Mick Delap. They've been at it since April. And the Census will continue to gather information until the end of June. We already know which birds are most often seen in Triangle gardens (can you guess? Answer below *). But the Census needs more help, to capture everything that's going on this Spring, day, and night. As well as the night time foxes, we know there are bats in the Triangle - but we don't know how common they are, or what species. Help us find out this - and much more.
The target is to have enough data by the end of June to write up a detailed account of the Triangle's wild life. You don't need to be an expert to contribute - everything helps. And there's a new website which provides basic information, and allows you to use your phone to record what you are seeing: www.trianglewildlife.co.uk . You can also get to the website by pointing your phone camera at the image below.

 

Alternatively, Mick Delap has a Spring Census Starter Pack he can send out. Contact him on mick@delap.plus.com to join in, or just to hear each week how the Spring Census is progressing.
It's easy to contribute - and it's fun. Be part of this exciting new project. (* And the commonest Triangle birds are Blue Tits, Great Tits, Blackbirds and Pigeons).

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